Brewing flavours of caffeine like a pro

Director of Coffee By Di Bella, Rahul Leekha, explains some newer techniques to brew the popular jitter juice.

By Author  |  Published: 13th Nov 2019  10:01 pmUpdated: 13th Nov 2019  11:28 pm
caffeine

We all have our go-to coffee, from cappuccinos, piccolos, flat whites, long blacks and lattes to flavoured coffees of hazelnut and caramel. If you’re lactose intolerant or avoiding dairy, you may prefer cold brews. Either way, we all have our caffeine craving that only the brew closest to our palette can fix. Ever wondered how they were brewed?

Director of Coffee By Di Bella, Rahul Leekha, explains some newer techniques to brew the popular jitter juice.

Siphon or syphon method

Siphon coffee was invented in the 1840s more or less simultaneously by a French homemaker and Scottish marine engineer. It produces a very fine and light coffee. Using simple physics, the syphon is a system of tubes and bulbs that makes one hell of a brew!
In a nutshell, a syphon coffee maker has two chambers. One is filled with water and heated to rise into the second chamber with the ground coffee beans. The water rises because of (and this is where the physics part comes in) vacuum and gravity to mix with the coffee. Even though this process has been improved with time, it’s one of the oldest and coolest coffee brewing methods!

Pro tip: Adding a pinch of cinnamon to your brew could elevate your taste buds to caffeinated heaven!

Aeropress method

This method is about a decade old and has had Baristas trying to perfect the brew with their concoctions. But if you want a method of brewing that is easy, cheap and gives you the jitter juice buzz you crave, Aeropress is right for you.
The crux of this method lies in an odd little gadget called the Aeropress consisting of the funnel, scoop and stirrer. Once it has been assembled, add the grounded coffee into the ring-shaped gutter and water to the halfway mark and the rest to fill the chamber. After a minute, flip the Aeropress and apply downward pressure. You know the coffee is done when the device starts to hiss.

Pro tip: You can have it on the rocks! Add the brewed coffee in a cocktail shaker and add 5 cubes of ice and vanilla ice cream and shake and pour into a glass.

Iced pour-over coffee

Cold brews have seen a long journey from their humble origins. It is now a huge segment of the coffee market. Though there are countless ways of making a chilled caffeinated drink, here’s one way for those coffee sommeliers that are pickier about their brew.

Place a cone and filter (use hot water to wet the filter) into a mug or glass. As the last of the water seeps through, dispose of it and add the coffee to the filter, gently ensuring that it is level. Begin pouring the water slowly and in circles, making sure all the beans are soaked and allowed to bloom and develop. Mix gently with a spoon and transfer the coffee into a highball glass with plenty of ice.

Pro tip: Add some vanilla syrup (20 ml) to your iced pour-over.