Dying galaxies formed 1.5bn years after Big Bang

A 'quenching' galaxy is a galaxy in the process of dying -- meaning its star formation is significantly suppressed.

By Author  |  Published: 21st Jan 2020  6:24 pm

The core of massive dying galaxies with more than a trillion stars was formed 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang — about 1 billion years earlier than previous measurements revealed, reveal astrophysicists.

Galaxies are broadly categorised as dead or alive: Dead galaxies are no longer forming stars, while alive galaxies are still bright with star formation activity.

A ‘quenching’ galaxy is a galaxy in the process of dying — meaning its star formation is significantly suppressed.

A team of researchers of the Cosmic Dawn Center at the Niels Bohr Institute at University of Copenhagen and the National Observatory of Japan recently discovered a massive galaxy dying already 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang, the most distant of its kind.

“This result pairs up with the fact that, when these dying gigantic systems were still alive and forming stars, they might have not been that extreme compared with the average population of galaxies”, added Francesco Valentino from the Niels Bohr Institute.