Watch: Here’s how Hyderabad looks from space

The ESA, as part of its public outreach ‘Space in Videos’ programme, in its fourth edition for this year, focused on Hyderabad, ‘one of the largest metropolitan areas in India’.

By Author  |  Published: 20th May 2018  1:16 pmUpdated: 21st May 2018  12:56 am
Hyderabad

Hyderabad: It looks like a chequered box, interspersed with some green, some blue lines and dark patches here and there. This is Hyderabad from space, all 786 km from above the earth. And the European Space Agency (ESA) has put together a video of what the city, capital of Telangana looks like from above. And what the details in the images mean.

The ESA, as part of its public outreach ‘Space in Videos’ programme, in its fourth edition for this year, focused on Hyderabad, ‘one of the largest metropolitan areas in India’. The image that is analyzed and explained about in the video was taken on ay 14, 2017, according to the ESA.

The ESA says the image of the city was processed to highlight “different features in and around the city. The yellow and browns show the built-up centre while the light greens in the surroundings show arid fields. The shades of darker green depict vegetation and areas covered by trees. Interestingly, the bright blue, which appears, for example, along the Musi River and near other water bodies, is also vegetation such as parkland and grass.”

The short video presents a quick overview of the city, its several geographical features and some of the environmental challenges Hyderabad faces. The images of the city from space were captured by ESA’s Sentinel 2A satellite, one of the two satellites launched by ESA as part its Sentinel-2 mission. The two satellites, according to ESA, are polar-orbiting and placed in the same orbit, phased at 180° to each other. The mission’s aim is to monitor variability in land surface conditions. Since the satellites can view wide swathes of earth below, and have a quick revisit time that ranges from 2-3 days to 10 days depending on the latitudes over which they fly, can also support monitoring of changes to vegetation within the growing season.

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