How a billionaire scion lived incognito in Hyderabad

Hitarth landed in Hyderabad on July 10, and according to a 30-minute video he has posted on Facebook narrating his experience, it was the first time he was in the city.

By Author   |   Published: 12th Aug 2017   4:38 pm Updated: 12th Aug 2017   5:01 pm
Hyderabad
Hitarth Dholakiam the founder of Hari Krishna Exports Private Limited, with his family.

Hyderabad: A city is as good as its people. And now, the US-educated scion of a Surat-based diamond trading billionaire family, who lived incognito in the city for a month, fending for himself without any support from the family, has testified the goodness of Hyderabad and its people.

Hitarth Dholakia, the son of Ghanshyam Dholakia, one of the founders of the Rs 6,000 crore-Hari Krishna Exports Private Limited, a diamond firm that has its presence in 71 countries, was in the city as part of an age-old family tradition that required him to live in a city unknown to him, without the family tag or even a mobile phone, to find a job on his own and moreover, to keep finding new jobs every week.

Hitarth landed in Hyderabad on July 10, and according to a 30-minute video he has posted on Facebook narrating his experience, it was the first time he was in the city. The battle for survival, as a totally independent person, taught him some of the most important lessons he had learned, those which he could not learn during his Business Administration course in New York, he says.

The grueling one month, during which he managed to find accommodation in cheap lodges in Secunderabad, at times with benevolent employers and colleagues, and had him eating from roadside eateries, saw him appearing for interviews, and landing jobs, mostly as a salesman, in restaurants, jewelleries, garment stores and footwear outlets as well. From McDonald’s to Jade Blue to Adidas, from salaries ranging from a few couple of thousands to Rs 17,000, Hitarth says he managed to get through interviews with his story of being the son of a poor farmer in Gujarat.

He could not reveal his actual qualifications, which saw some clever interviewers grilling him after getting suspicious. But he managed to keep his cover intact, he says, adding that the fact that he could not produce his actual identity card for verification purposes during interviews was a tough task.

But even then, he managed to survive, and learn life.

“I could understand how the minds of salesmen work, what they think about their bosses and the pressure they are under,” he says, adding that there were “really good” people in Hyderabad, some who offered him accommodation without demanding anything after they felt he was ‘a nice guy’.

He also narrates his experience in restaurants here, saying that he discovered that Hyderabad had two different sections even for vegetarians. These were ‘Veg’ and ‘Pure Veg’, with the Veg meaning curry that had the chicken pieces removed.

He also says he managed sales worth Rs 18,000 on just his third day as a salesman with Adidas, which was something he was really proud of. Hitarth says the goodness of the people he met and who employed him made him take special care not to hurt anyone.