Hyderabadis in Gulf not pepped about hosting community Iftar

The Indian Malayali community is also in the forefront in hosting massive community Iftar programmes on a daily basis across the region, from Dubai in UAE to Tabuk in Saudi Arabia.

By Author  |  Published: 1st Jun 2019  12:05 amUpdated: 31st May 2019  11:21 pm
People at the Clock Tower Iftar in Muscat, the largest Hyderabadi gathering not only in Oman but also in the entire Gulf region.

Jeddah: Every year, thousands of Muslim NRI workers from India — mainly low-paid workers, who work here away from their families and home — are welcomed by some philanthropists across the Gulf region who host Iftar for them in the true spirit of Ramzan.

The tenets of Islam state that hosting Iftar, known as maah-e-muqaddas in India and shar-e-kareem in the Gulf, during Ramzan is one of the noblest deeds. Arab hospitality is amply portrayed at Iftar parties hosted in tents and courtyards of mosques.

The Indian Malayali community is also in the forefront in hosting massive community Iftar programmes on a daily basis across the region, from Dubai in UAE to Tabuk in Saudi Arabia. The low-paid workers, bachelors and passersby who step in to break their fast on time are the main guests at the Iftar parties every evening. The guests consume half the food on the spot and take the remaining home to have it for Suhoor.

The Telangana NRI community in general and Hyderabad, in particular, lag behind in this direction. Though, there is a spurt in Iftar parties organised by the Hyderabadi NRI community in the region with several organsiations hosting Iftar parties for their members. But, the nature of these parties is symbolic where only select white collar NRIs are invited, unlike how the Malayalis do it.

However, some of the Hyderabadi Muslim community organisations and individuals organise a massive Iftar party that is open to all once in Ramzan. One such community Iftar organised in Muscat, Oman, is one of the significant Ramzan events of Hyderabadis not only in the Sultanate but also other parts of the Gulf.

Clock Tower Iftar, as it is popularly known in Oman, is an initiative by Dr Mohammed Abdul Mohi — a first generation Hyderabadi NRI who came to Oman in 1970 after working as a doctor in Asifabad in Adilabad district. Since 17 years the tradition of Hyderabadi Iftar party continues in Muscat, despite Dr Mohi leaving Oman. Its popularity just seems to grow every Ramzan. The traditional Hyderabadi event in Muscat is now being organised under the umbrella of the newly formed Deccani Wing of Indian Social Club, which operates under the aegis of the Indian Embassy. “We hosted the largest gathering of the city,” said Dr SM Wasifuddin of Deccan Wing in Oman.

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