India’s first ever Nutritional Atlas goes live

After a painstaking exercise of collecting and collating public data from several sources for close to two years, NIN researchers made the data available at the click of a mouse.

By Author   |   Published: 14th Sep 2017   12:05 am Updated: 14th Sep 2017   12:25 am
  • ANAEMIA
  • STUNTING
  • WASTING
  • UNDERWEIGHT
  • OVERWEIGHT
  • NON-COMMUNICABLE
  • COMMUNICABLE

ANAEMIA

g/dl- Haemoglobin in grams per decilitre.

Source: National Family Health Survey (NFHS).

STUNTING

Sources: National Family Health Survey (NFHS). District Level Household Survey (DLHS). 2012-2013: Assam,Bihar,Chhattisgarh,Jharkhand,Madhyapradesh,Odisha,Rajasthan,Uttarapradesh,Uttarakhand states data adpoted from Annual Health Survey (AHS:2011-2014)

WASTING

Sources: National Family Health Survey (NFHS). District Level Household Survey (DLHS). 2012-2013: Assam,Bihar,Chhattisgarh,Jharkhand,Madhyapradesh,Odisha,Rajasthan,Uttarapradesh,Uttarakhand states data adpoted from Annual Health Survey (AHS:2011-2014)

UNDERWEIGHT

Sources: National Family Health Survey (NFHS). District Level Household Survey (DLHS). 2012-2013: Assam,Bihar,Chhattisgarh,Jharkhand,Madhyapradesh,Odisha,Rajasthan,Uttarapradesh,Uttarakhand states data adpoted from Annual Health Survey (AHS:2011-2014)

OVERWEIGHT

Source: National Family Health Survey (NFHS).

NON-COMMUNICABLE

Source:District Level Household Survey(DLHS-4:2012-2013)

COMMUNICABLE

Source:National AIDS Control Organisation (Estimates).

SOURCE: National Institute of Nutrition

Hyderabad: The country’s first Nutritional Atlas that charts the nutritional status of people at the national and State-level, developed by researchers of Hyderabad-based National Institute of Nutrition (NIN), has gone live on the internet.

After a painstaking exercise of collecting and collating public data from several sources for close to two years, NIN researchers made the data available at the click of a mouse.

The micro and macro-level data related to nutritional status, communicable and non-communicable diseases and host of other parameters of various population groups in the country have been put together in a virtual, interactive and intuitive format on the Nutrition Atlas.

The online tool also provides information on nutrients, nutrient-rich foods, nutritional deficiency disorders and recommended allowances. The existing data in the Atlas will be updated in real time, whenever newer and more reputed studies come through.

“It took a lot of time and energy to compile, analyse and collate data from a host of sources. The aim is to provide authentic source of information to public and policy makers on nutritional status, communicable and non-communicable diseases and overall health of India and individual States,” says Dr M Vishnu Vardhana Rao of Biomedical Informatics Centre, NIN.

The dashboard of the Atlas is the heart of the online tool, which provides diverse data on anaemia, stunting, overweight, underweight, communicable diseases and non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. The data is displayed in a colour-coded format and all that one has to do is point the mouse over a State to read it.

“People tend to use internet search a lot to access such information. But, more often than not, the credibility of such information is questioned. That’s why we went ahead and used public databases for the Atlas,” Dr Rao said.

The NIN researchers used data from National Family Health Survey (NFHS), District House Surveys conducted in the past and data put out by World Health Organisation (WHO). “There could be instances of difference in these surveys because of their unique method of data collection. The idea was to provide a ready reckoner for public and policymakers who are looking for data,” the NIN researcher said.

The development team included Dr Manne Munikumar, Dr Perugu Shyam and Dr Bolla Rajeswari.