We shall fight, we shall win

These protests are a sure shot sign of an age-old movement gaining momentum.

By Author  |  Published: 22nd Jan 2017  11:01 pmUpdated: 23rd Jan 2017  2:41 pm
women
Women’s march organised at Necklace Road, on the day of the inauguration of President Donald J Trump, with women’s rights as the primary focus.

Women from different corners of the world marched out towards a common goal on Saturday evening. The protests, largely triggered by social media, stands as a strong paradigm of the struggle towards women’s rights and empowerment. 

In India, through the #IWillGoOut movement, women reclaimed public spaces making a strong statement that they will go out and claim the nights as their own. In Hyderabad, over 300 people gathered at the Necklace Road and the number only increased as the march progressed. “It was an experience of a lifetime. We started off with 250 people but as the march progressed, more people joined, to stand up for a social case, without even thinking twice. It showed the power of unity,” said Sakshi Baranwala, a Masters student in TISS and one of the organisers. 

Women’s march was organised on the day of the inauguration of President Donald J Trump, with women’s rights as the primary focus. Initially centred around Washington  DC, the protest gained momentum drawing millions worldwide. The protesters were spotted donning a ‘pink hat’, corners of which resembled to that of cat ears, a sharp jibe at Trump’s widely-reported remark that received flak from all over the world.

“Protest of even bigger magnitude has happened before too. But the impact was short-lived. What we need is change from the grassroot level, like proper sex education to boys and girls alike in school-level,” opines Meghna Reddy, a city-based women’s rights activist.