Krishna and his three ‘leelas’

You cannot miss out on the visible parallels with Lord Krishna. Since it is a Telugu film romance, the filmmaker Ravikanth Perepu continues to suspect the intelligence of the viewer. Even the names, therefore, scream what could have been intriguing

By   |  Published: 29th Jun 2020  12:04 amUpdated: 29th Jun 2020  5:47 am

You cannot miss out on the visible parallels with Lord Krishna. Since it is a Telugu film romance, the filmmaker Ravikanth Perepu continues to suspect the intelligence of the viewer. Even the names, therefore, scream what could have been intriguing.

So, we have Krishna (Sidhu Jonnalagadda), Satyabhama (Shraddha Srinath), Radha (Shalini Vadnikatti) and the non-competitive winner in Rukmini – Ruksaar (Seerat Kapoor). One man, three women. We have had the Ranbir module in Bachna Ae Haseeno, Shahid – Dil Mange More, Kapil Sharma – Kis Kis Ko Pyar Karoon and Ranveer – Ladies Vs Ricky Bahl.

This notwithstanding, a filmmaker has myriad opportunities to stamp a unique stance or even improvise an attempted one. You wonder, if three is a numerical extension of the Shoban Babu, Jagapathi Babu modules. What can however, be recorded in favour of the filmmaker is he does not bring in the sacrificial lamb, the sponge, and the cry epitome. At a time when cinema elsewhere is daring new parts, learn albeit with mistakes even within ‘other Woods’, Telugu film industry is so far from Tolly Gunj. It is arguably escapist to pass the buck onto the audience and savour the non-artistic inertia of template replication.

We have Krishna who is first dumped by Satya who falls for Radha on the rebound. While in a relationship with Radha, he runs into Satya. He lies his way through and has relationships with both simultaneously. A product of a broken marriage, the film tiringly moves towards a climax at his sister’s (Samyukta Hornard) wedding. While he two-times the women, there seems to be a genetic connect as a defence.

Trust Sampath and Jhansi to add credibility even in the miniscule moments. Every other character is very much an extract from the textbook. The ambitious Satya in Shraddha Srinath or the in-love Radha in Shalini, the characters do not attract empathy. It may be an interesting idea to deal with contemporary modules, but they did not have to become stereotypes. It is the stereotyping of male-matters and matrimony that builds around one single man’s hypocrisy and indecisiveness. Much ado about nothing and a filmmaker who can imagine but not handle. Almost at the end of the film, Krishna says “Everybody wants a closure”. That’s what the audience is itching for.