KRMB notifies working manual

The board, as per the working manual, can refer to the Apex Council for its consideration on any matter that would require interpretation on regulations as well as matters that were not agreeable.

By Author   |   Published: 23rd Sep 2017   11:12 pm

Hyderabad: The Krishna River Management Board (KRMB) has extended its role to maintenance of dams, reservoirs, head works, regulation of projects falling in its jurisdiction.

Besides regulation of water supply from the projects, the board secretariat has shouldered the task of maintaining even the main canals of the common projects that cater to the needs of both Telangana and Andhra Pradesh.

The new responsibilities sought to be shouldered by the board are aimed at relieving the two States of their operative control over Nagarjunasagar and Srisailam projects respectively.

There was considerable discussion on the issue even in the last meeting held at Vijayawada.

The Irrigation authorities representing Telangana had their own reservations on the issue while AP was keen on passing over the responsibility to the board.

The Board also decided to continue the mutually agreed adhoc working arrangement for the purpose of regulation of water supply till a new arrangement between the two States or awards by Tribunals concerned were notified.

Implementation of recommendations on dam safety, flood monitoring and disaster management were among the joint responsibilities entrusted to the board as well as the State governments.

The board, as per the working manual, can refer to the Apex Council for its consideration on any matter that would require interpretation on regulations as well as matters that were not agreeable. Besides this, either of the State governments can refer any matter for consideration of the Apex Council. In case of need, the board may seek the intervention of Central and State paramilitary force.

The board made it clear in the manual that in the event of a conflicting demand of water for irrigation and drinking water, requirement for drinking water would take precedence. In the event of a conflicting demand for irrigation and power needs, the requirement of water for irrigation needs shall take precedence, asserted the board.