Lisaa: A messed up psychological horror thriller

Makarand Deshpande as a psycho is the scene-stealer and the humour episodes added for some comic relief are seemingly forced in the 110-minute long 'horror thriller'.

By Author  |  Published: 25th May 2019  3:41 pm

A haunted house, things in the house moving in a mysterious fashion, and the place having some back story, a message at the end, all these ingredients makes the recipe for any horror-comedy or horror-thriller film in the recent times, especially in Tollywood and Kollywood. Actor Anjali starrer Lisaa is yet another such attempt and it turns out be futile.

Anjali (Lisaa) has lost her father and stays with her single mom. Lisaa who is in search of finding a match for her mother gets to know how her grandparents disapproved the love marriage of her mother. Lisaa then decides to visit her grandparents who stay in a secluded house somewhere in the Western Ghats.

Along with her friend Jaggu (Sam Jones), she goes to the place and from day one, Jaggu observes the strange behavior of Lisaa’s grandparents played by Makarand Deshpande and Saleema. He also witnesses paranormal activities in the house, which is shrugged off by Lisaa.

But Lisaa also realizes what Jaggu has been speaking about only to know that the old couple were not her grandparents. Who are the old couple, what will they do to Lisaa and Jaggu, will the ghost in the house helps them to escape. It all is what ‘Lisaa’ all about.

Director Raju Vishwanath, in this movie loosely based on 2015 American movie – The Visit, carries the first half decently with some jump scares but completely lets down in the second half, where he tries really hard to include a social message. The movie gets messed up in a confusion whether to make it a psycho-thriller or a horror thriller and ends up becoming none.

Lisaa is touted as the first Telugu 3D horror thriller, but after watching the movie one feels as if the 3D aspect was added just to make the claim. There hardly are any jaw-dropping 3D effects and the script doesn’t even demand one. This movie in 2D perhaps would have been a more comfortable experience for the audience.

Though the plotline looks interesting on paper, it goes haywire in execution. Makarand Deshpande as a psycho is the scene-stealer and the humour episodes added for some comic relief are seemingly forced in the 110-minute long ‘horror thriller’.