Madrassa students are second to none: MANUU Pro VC

To substantiate his claim he referred to the recent success of Shahid T. Komath from Kerala, who had all his schooling from Madrassa.

By Author  |  Published: 14th May 2018  12:32 amUpdated: 13th May 2018  5:23 pm
MANUU
Prof. Hasan Abbas (R) presenting a memento of Raza Library, Rampur to Prof. Shakeel Ahmad.

Hyderabad: Students coming out from Madrassas are second to none in terms of intelligence and hard work. That’s why these students are coming out with flying colours in the toughest competitive examinations like civil services, Prof. Shakeel Ahmad, Pro Vice-Chancellor, Maulana Azad National Urdu University (MANUU) said

To substantiate his claim he referred to the recent success of Shahid T. Komath from Kerala, who had all his schooling from Madrassa.

Participating in the national seminar on ‘The contribution of Madarsas in the Promotion of Persian Language and Literature’ held at Central Library Auditorium, MANUU, Prof. Shakeel Ahmad said interestingly Shahid availed the residential coaching facility offered by MANUU Civil Services Academy to prepare for the prelims.

Prof. Ahmad expressed the need for enhanced interface between universities like MANUU and Madrassas.

The Department of Persian, MANUU in collaboration with Fakharuddin Ali Ahmed Memorial Committee (FAAMC), Lucknow has organized the national seminar.

Mufti Khaleel Ahmed, Vice-Chancellor, Jamia Nizamia, Hyderabad in his address referred to the wealth of knowledge present in the Persian language.

“We simply cannot ignore the heritage of our forefathers. Language, neither has a religion nor bear identity of any sect,” he said.

Prof. Hasan Abbas, noted Persian Scholar and Director, Raza Library, Rampur (UP) in his keynote address threw light on different phases of history of madrassas, prominent seminaries and their curriculum.

Prof. Arif Ayyubi, Chairman, Fakharuddin Ali Ahmed Memorial Committee (FAAMC), Lucknow in his speech said the success of madrassa system is undeniable but as a matter of fact the system is fast losing its relevance in the contemporary world.