Rohingya refugees await help

More than 2,000 Rohingya refugees have been camping in the city for over two years now. The Rohingyas arrived in India after being attacked by Rakhine Budhists, while Myanmar’s forces did little to stop the assaults.

By   |  Published: 28th Nov 2016  9:30 pm
Rohingya refugee camp in Hyderabad. Photo: Moulika KV

Hyderabad: All is not well for Rohingya refugees from Myanmar, who have been struggling for survival in makeshift camps in the city.

The Rohingyas arrived in India after being attacked by the ethnic Rakhine Budhists, while Myanmar’s government forces did little to stop the violent assaults.

More than 2,000 Rohingya refugees have been camping in the city for over two years now, but basic amenities such as food, clean water, medicine and clothes still elude them.

The community has been struggling in these camps, hoping that someday, some help will reach them. A number of women and elderly are living in precarious conditions, but children are the worst affected, with many falling sick due to the lack of proper food and medicine.

Ahmed Basha, 38, points towards his three-year-old son, who was crying uncontrollably, and says that he had been suffering from severe fever and stomach virus.

“Our children are malnourished. The food we eat is not of good quality. We struggle for basic needs such as clean drinking water and medicines,” he said.

Another refugee, Mohammad Imamuddin, 30, who fled Myanmar with his wife and two children, says that life continues to pose great challenges.

“We are deprived of good health and shelter. We have been awaiting help from the time we got here,” said Imamuddin, who has been living in the settlement for more than a year.
Also, lack of fluency in the local languages has badly affected their job prospects.

According to the UN Refugee Agency, there are about 5,500 Rohingya refugees and asylum-seekers from Myanmar registered in India spread across the States of Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, Delhi, Jammu, Haryana, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh.

Most of them live in settlements while a few who have found jobs have rented houses. But that’s only a few. Uncertainty and despair continue to haunt the majority.