This is how fins evolved into human hands

The evolution of fishes into four-legged vertebrates was one of the most significant events in the history of life, the study noted

By Author  |  Published: 23rd Mar 2020  8:07 pm

Researchers have revealed new insights into how the human hand evolved from fish fins based on their analysis of an ancient fossil found in Miguasha, Canada. The study, published in the journal Nature, noted that the 1.57 metre long fossil shows the complete arm — pectoral fin — skeleton for the first time in any elpistostegalian fish.

“This is the first time that we have unequivocally discovered fingers locked in a fin with fin-rays in any known fish,” said John Long, study co-author from Flinders University Professor. The finding, according to the researchers, pushes back the origin of fingers in vertebrates to the fish level. They said it also reveals that the patterning for the vertebrate hand was first developed deep in evolution, just before fishes left the water.

The evolution of fishes into four-legged vertebrates was one of the most significant events in the history of life, the study noted. With this adaptation, the scientists said, vertebrates, or back-boned animals, were then able to leave the water and conquer land. To complete this transition, they said, one of the most significant changes was the evolution of hands and feet.

“The origin of digits relates to developing the capability for the fish to support its weight in shallow water or for short trips out on land. The increased number of small bones in the fin allows more planes of flexibility to spread out its weight through the fin,” said study co-author Richard Cloutier from the Universite du Quebec in Canada.