US aspirants do a rethink

Students, particularly girls, are planning to join premier institutions such as Indian Institutes of Technology, Indian Institutes of Management or B-Schools in the country or colleges in other countries rather than the US.

By Author   |   Published: 13th Nov 2017   12:17 am Updated: 13th Nov 2017   1:44 am
US
Education experts say that since 2015, the craze for US universities has been gradually dipping due to incidents of deportation.

Hyderabad: A series of events, starting from the deportation controversy to Donald Trump’s new policies and a few attacks on Indians, has cast a shadow on the dreams of Indian students, particularly females, who were planning going to universities in the United States.They are now planning to join premier institutions like Indian Institutes of Technology, Indian Institutes of Management or B-Schools in the country or colleges in some other country rather than the US.

Recently, speaking at the US Education Fair held here, US Consul General Katherine Hadda remarked that not enough female students were applying to study in the United States. She said the world needs more female leaders and encouraged girls to apply for courses in the US.

On the attacks on Indian students, she said that they were isolated incidents and that universities were according top priority to security of foreign students in coordination with local police and administration. However, US education experts say that since 2015, the craze for the US universities has been gradually dipping because of the attacks and incidents of deportation.

“Attacks on Indians have created a negative impact among parents and students going abroad especially after incident of Srinivas Kuchibhotla, a techie who was killed ther. There is a decline in number of not just girls but also boys joining US varsities,” said G Narsi Reddy, a US education expert.

Another major concern students were facing was the number of unaccredited universities or colleges. Last year, the US government cracked down errant colleges and shut down around 400 of them. Majority of the students studying in these colleges were Indians and mostly Telugu speaking. To continue their academics, some students joined other accredited universities in the US, while many were sent back home.

Now, parents feel that instead of spending huge amounts of money by taking education loans from the banks to send their wards to US colleges, they can spend the same for admission in premiere institutions here in India.

“So far, there is no change in the rules of the admission or visa process. But we do not know what decision the US government might take. So it’s better to prefer a country which is a safe place to study or to join a good college in India,” S Venu, a parent said.

“I had planned for my higher education in the US, but my parents did not agree. So I am planning for Canada or Australia for MS,” said Manisha, a BTech student.