Words in a frame

Instakavi, a popular hashtag started by hobbyist poets brings local talent to the fore

By Author  |  Published: 23rd Jun 2019  12:43 amUpdated: 22nd Jun 2019  2:20 pm

The abilities of a medium depends solely on the user. Likewise, popular visual media sharing platform, Instagram is at no loss of words, as budding local poets are sharing their thoughts in micro poems, under the hashtag ‘#instakavi’, which roughly translates to ‘poets of Instagram’.

Having established a steady follower base for his scribble art, Harish Bhagavathula writes poetry in Telugu, and soulful philosophical pieces in English. Under the garb of the platform, he expresses himself in a few words, and posts it on his stories for followers to see. “The primary reason for me to use Instagram is that it is more private than other social media. And there’s also a choice to be anonymous; and anonymity boosts one’s creative side,” he explains.

These social media bards, use Stories and Post options to publish different work — stories for micro-poetry, and post the longer poems as captions under a relevant picture. “I didn’t want to disturb my gallery with anything else, so I prefer using stories for my Telugu write-ups,” maintains the artist.

Keeping aside its perks, Instagram comes with its own limitations, he adds, “It wasn’t very convenient at first — especially when typing inside the app. You press one wrong button, and it’s all gone. So, I started to write first and then post. But limitations are always a positive if used wisely. ”

While some are busy promoting their art, some believe in the saying art for art’s sake, and write, post under an alias. Calling his poetic side an impulse, he adds, “The people I see, the situations I am in, they suddenly trigger an urge to put them in words, and I immediately come here to post.”

Anonymity brings one genuine feedback he says. “Some of my female artist friends are not sure if all the follows and likes they get are because of their work or because of their gender. Here you get a chance to be a no-one.” Whether or not there is anonymity, the pattern marks the shifting user base of Mirakee, Terribly Tiny Tales, and Micropoetry.com to Instagram.