​LV Prasad Eye Institute develops the first ‘Holo Eye Anatomy’

The users after wearing the Microsoft Hololens can see the 3D objects i.e. various anatomical parts of the eye floating around in the mid-air.

By Author  |  Published: 21st Jun 2017  7:56 pm
​LV Prasad Eye Institute
The virtual-reality like headset that allows users to see and interact with 3D visuals,

Hyderabad: Medical students and ophthalmology specialists need not struggle anymore while learning to understand the complicated structure of eye!

The eye researchers at city-based L V Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI) have developed a 3D eye anatomy module of the cornea that can be seen through Microsoft’s Hololens, the virtual-reality like headset that allows users to see and interact with 3D visuals, in this case the various layers of the eye.

The users after wearing the Microsoft Hololens can see the 3D objects i.e. various anatomical parts of the eye floating around in the mid-air, which not only gives the users an immersive experience but also allows them to interact with the 3D objects.

“Our vision is to reconcile excellence with equity. As we incorporate more and more technological tools, we hope that our education and research efforts can be significantly enhanced both qualitatively and quantitatively,” said Founder and Chair, LVPEI, Dr Gullapalli N Rao in a statement.

The device, dubbed as ‘Holo Eye Anatomy’ can be worn like any other virtual reality headset, the difference being that Microsoft Hololens is based on the concept of allowing users to interact with the 3D objects that appear to be floating in the mid-air.

The process starts with an artist rendering the images of the models (i.e. eye) and then the models are coded on to the device and projected through the Microsoft Hololens. The framework is built to encompass different layers of education like clinicians, residents and allied personnel in the field of eye care, a statement from LVPEI explained.

“This technology adds a whole new dimension to teaching and learning by allowing you to project information of 3D models in space and learn in a new perspective. Learning is made more experiential, enabling us to holistically study the cornea and also split individual parts to the component layers to study them in detail,” says Director, Srujana Centre for Innovation, LVPEI, Dr. Virender Sangwan.

Watch how the new technology works: